HERMAN WILLEM DAENDELS ( 1762 – 1818) MILITAR AND COLONIAL CAREER. HE WAS FAMOUS WITH HIS BRUTALITY AS COLONIAL GOVERNOR REGIME IN BATAVIA,TODAY'S JAKARTA,INDONESIA.THE DUTCH COLONIALISM IN INDONESIA FOR ALMOST 350 YEARS KILLED MILLION INDONESIANS,THE WORLD NEVER INVESTIGATE IT.

Governor Herman Willem Daendels (21 October 1762 – 2 May 1818) was a Dutch politician who served as the 36th Governor General of the Dutch East Indies between 1808 and 1811 in  Batavia/Jakarta.He was famous with his brutality.

Daendels twice helped to overthrow the government of the United Provinces by force (January and June 1798). In 1799 Daendels, who had attained the rank of lieutenant general, successfully commanded a Dutch army at Alkmaar, Neth., against an Anglo-Russian force that was attempting to detach the Netherlands from Revolutionary France.France's Louis Bonaparte made Daendels colonel-general in 1806 and Governor-General of the Dutch East Indies in 1807. After a long voyage, he arrived in the city of Batavia (now Jakarta) on 5 January 1808 and relieved the former Governor General, Albertus Wiese. His primary task was to rid the island of Java of the British Army, which he promptly achieved.He built new hospitals and military barracks, a new arms factories in Surabaya and Semarang, and a new military college in Batavia. He demolished the Castle in Batavia and replaced it with a new fort at Meester Cornelis (Jatinegara), and built Fort Lodewijk (Fort Ludwig) in Surabaya. He also moved the central government from Old Batavia to Weltevreden, with a palace built in Paradeplaats. However, his best-known achievement was the construction of the Great Post Road (Indonesian: Jalan Raya Pos) across northern Java from Anjer to Panaroecan. The road now serves as the main road in the island of Java, called Jalur Pantura. The thousand-kilometre road was completed in only one year, during which thousands of Javanese forced labourers died.He displayed a firm attitude towards the Javanese rulers, with the result that the rulers were willing to work with the British against the Dutch. He also subjected the population of Java to forced labour (Rodi). There were some rebellious actions against this, such as those in Cadas Pangeran, West Java.There is considerable debate as to whether he increased the efficiency of the local bureaucracy and reduced corruption, although he certainly enriched himself during this period.General in Napoleon's Grande Armée.When the Kingdom of Holland was incorporated into France in 1810, Daendels returned to Holland. He was appointed a Divisional General (Major General) and commanded the 26th Division of the Grande Armée in Napoleon's invasion of Russia.

De Grote Postweg, the great post road. Built by Herman Willem Daendels, Governor General of the Dutch East Indies in 1808. The road was intended to ease military support and transportation in order to defend Java from British invasion.

After the fall of Napoleon, king Willem I and the new Dutch government feared that Daendels could become an influential and powerful opposition leader and effectively banned him from the Netherlands by appointing him Governor-General of the Dutch Gold Coast (now part of Ghana). In the aftermath of the abolition of the Atlantic slave trade, Daendels tried to redevelop the rather dilapidated Dutch possessions as an African plantation colony driven by legitimate trade. Drawing on his experience from the East Indies, he came up with some very ambitious infrastructural projects, including a comprehensive road system, with a main road connecting Elmina and Kumasi in Ashanti. The Dutch government gave him a free hand and a substantial budget to implement his plans. At the same time, however, Daendels regarded his governorship as an opportunity to establish a private business monopoly in the Dutch Gold Coast.In 1817, the British accused Daendels of aiding and abetting the slave trade – which had by then been prohibited by both the British and the Dutch nations – from his position at the Elmina fort which was then under Dutch control. "We deem it our duty to inform you of the conduct of General Daendels who is acting independent of his Government", the British Governor of Cape Coast, John Smith, wrote to the African Committee in Parliament in London on 5th March 1817. "Portuguese vessels are furnished with canoes, and Spaniards supplied with water. The beginning of last month a large Spanish ship was four days at anchor in Elmina roads, receiving water and bartering dollars for such goods as were suited for the purchase of slaves."Eventually none of the plans came to fruition, as Daendels died of malaria in the castle of St. George d'Elmina, the Dutch seat of government, on 2 May 1818. His body was interred in the central tomb at the Dutch cemetery in Elmina. He had been in the country less than two years.



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